Tuesday, February 20

Day: April 25, 2016

Whether it’s Brexit or remain: David Cameron is not going anywhere
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

Whether it’s Brexit or remain: David Cameron is not going anywhere

    What a long distance David Cameron has travelled in the course of his party leadership. It is almost 10 years since he caused offence in Washington with a speech on the fifth anniversary of 9/11, in which he sought to distinguish himself both from neo-conservatives and from the presidential poodle that Tony Blair had supposedly become. “We will serve neither our own, nor America’s, nor the world’s interests if we are seen as America’s unconditional associate in every endeavour,” he said. “Liberty grows from the ground,” he further insisted. “It cannot be dropped from the air by an unmanned drone.” In the White House, there were those who wondered what sort of friend to America this prospective prime minister could conceivably turn out to be. They need not have worried. On ...
108 years old message in bottle is oldest ever found
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

108 years old message in bottle is oldest ever found

    The oldest message in a bottle spent 108 years, 4 months and 18 days at sea before it was finally delivered, reports LiveScience.com After being cast into the sea by the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom (MBA) in November 1906, the message washed up at Amrum Island, in Germany, on April 17, 2015. This year, Guinness World Records recognized it as the oldest message in a bottle ever found. One of more than 1,000 bottles thrown into the North Sea by marine biologist George Parker Bidder, the bottle was part of a research project on the patterns of ocean currents. More than a century later, a letter containing an original postcard from one of his bottles arrived in the mail at the MBA's Plymouth laboratory in the United Kingdom. A German woman discovered the...
Facebook was the victim of a backdoor hack
ENGLISH, Technology

Facebook was the victim of a backdoor hack

    Even a tech giant like Facebook isn't immune to significant security breaches. Devcore's Orange Tsai recently discovered that someone had installed a backdoor on one of Facebook's corporate servers (that is, not the social network itself) in a bid to swipe workers login details. While it's not clear how successful the script-based exploit was, Tsai noted that the file transfer app hosted on the server had several vulnerabilities that effectively gave any intruder free rein. The attacker could have checked employee email, for instance, or even connected to Facebook's virtual private network to get access to the company's inner workings. Thankfully, this is all past tense. You're only hearing about this now because Tsai reported the bugs to Facebook (to get a bounty, natural...
Bangladesh Bank heist: Attackers hacked SWIFT software
Bangladesh, ENGLISH

Bangladesh Bank heist: Attackers hacked SWIFT software

    The attackers who stole $81 million from the Bangladesh central bank probably hacked into software from the SWIFT financial platform that is at the heart of the global financial system, said security researchers at British defense contractor BAE Systems. SWIFT, a cooperative owned by 3,000 financial institutions, confirmed to Reuters that it was aware of malware targeting its client software. Its spokeswoman Natasha Deteran said SWIFT would release on Monday a software update to thwart the malware, along with a special warning for financial institutions to scrutinize their security procedures. The new developments now coming to light in the unprecedented cyber-heist suggest that an essential lynchpin of the global financial system could be more vulnerable than previously u...
Saudi Arabia, 9/11, and the secret papers that could ignite a diplomatic war
America, ENGLISH

Saudi Arabia, 9/11, and the secret papers that could ignite a diplomatic war

    Twenty-eight secret pages of a report locked away in a room in the Capitol in Washington lie in the centre of a crisis between America and Saudi Arabia which threatens to have severe and widespread repercussions. The US Congress is considering legislation which would enable the families of victims of the September 11 attacks to sue Saudi Arabia, presented by the West as its most valuable ally in the Middle East, over alleged links with al-Qaeda terrorists who carried out the attacks on New York and Washington. The issue had cast a long shadow over the recent visit of President Barack Obama to Riyadh, with the Saudis threatening to sell off $750bn of American assets they hold if the bill is passed by Congress. The classified pages are in a file titled “Finding, Discussion a...