Saturday, July 2

Day: July 20, 2016

Brexit: UK economy yet to suffer slowdown following EU vote, says Bank of England
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

Brexit: UK economy yet to suffer slowdown following EU vote, says Bank of England

    The Bank of England is yet to see any clear evidence of an economic downturn due to Britain's decision to vote in favour of leaving the European Union, although hiring and investments were being put on hold. Business uncertainty has "risen markedly" in the four weeks following the EU referendum, but there was no evidence that consumers had reined in their spending, the BoE's regional agents said on Wednesday (20 July). "A majority of firms spoken with did not expect a near-term impact from the result on their investment or staff-hiring plans," Britain's central bank said in a statement. "But around a third of contacts thought there would be some negative impact on those plans over the next 12 months. As yet, there was no clear evidence of a sharp general slowing in activit...
UK heatwave: Can you just go home if it gets too hot at work?
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

UK heatwave: Can you just go home if it gets too hot at work?

    How hot does it have to get before you can go home from work? With temperatures heading into the 30s this week, it's fair to ask whether you can be kept at work as things get uncomfortable. When the workplace gets too hot it is more than just an issue about comfort, the TUC argues. If the temperature goes too high then it can become a health and safety issue. If people get too hot, they risk dizziness, fainting, or even heat cramps. In very hot conditions the body’s blood temperature rises. If the blood temperature rises above 39 °C, there is a risk of heat stroke or collapse. Delirium or confusion can occur above 41°C. Blood temperatures at this level can prove fatal and even if a worker does recover, they may suffer irreparable organ damage. So what are your rights...
UK Will Not Take On EU Lead Role, Says PM
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

UK Will Not Take On EU Lead Role, Says PM

    The UK will not take up its six-month presidency of the European Council in 2017, the Prime Minister has said. In the first concrete signs of the country's preparations to leave the bloc, Theresa May told council president Donald Tusk the UK would be "prioritising the negotiations to leave the EU" so relinquishing the role was "the right thing to do". During her first conversation with Mr Tusk since she became Prime Minister, she also warned the UK would need to "carefully prepare" for Brexit negotiations before triggering Article 50, the process that officially starts divorce proceedings. The council is the body that sets the priorities and general direction of the EU and it is made up of the heads of state from each of the EU countries. The presidency rotates between the...
Comedian Boris Johnson gets destroyed by hecklers from the American press
ENGLISH, London

Comedian Boris Johnson gets destroyed by hecklers from the American press

    There comes an unfortunate moment in the life of every great stand-up when they decide they must get serious. Russell Brand tried to overthrow global capitalism via a webcam in his en suite bedroom. Jim Davidson put away childish things and moved on to presenting a snooker based game show. Eddie Izzard went on Question Time in a pink beret, and may do so again. None of them, however, ever made the great leap up to being Foreign Secretary, and it’s just as well. As Boris Johnson found out in his first public appearance in the job, when you’ve spent long decades as the nation’s political lolmeister-in-chief, then suddenly you’re launching in two-footed with the Yemen and Syria stuff, well, you're always going to find yourself up against a tough crowd. Earlier in the day, he’...
Theresa May evokes Margaret Thatcher with jibe at Jeremy Corbyn in first PMQs
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

Theresa May evokes Margaret Thatcher with jibe at Jeremy Corbyn in first PMQs

    Theresa May has prompted a barrage of comparisons with Margaret Thatcher following her first appearance at Prime Minister’s Questions. Responding to a question from Jeremy Corbyn about workers with unscrupulous bosses, Ms May suggested the embattled Labour leader may have “many members on the opposition benches who might be familiar with an unscrupulous boss”. Warming to her theme, she suggested: “A boss who doesn’t listen to his workers?” “A boss who requires some of his workers to double their workload?” “Maybe even a boss who exploits the rules to further his own career.” Leaning into the despatch box, Ms May then raised her voice and - in a manner eerily reminiscent of party's previous female premier - asked Mr Corbyn: “Remind him of anybody?” Though she was allud...