Thursday, February 22

Day: March 15, 2017

Secrets of Queen Elizabeth’s private homes
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

Secrets of Queen Elizabeth’s private homes

Her Majesty's palatial pads The news that Buckingham Palace, Queen Elizabeth II's London bolthole, is set to undergo a major makeover comes as no surprise. The crumbling palace hasn't been renovated since the 50s and is in dire need of a facelift. As UK taxpayers mull over the expense of the $456 million (£369m) 10-year refurb, which is scheduled to begin next April, we take you through the keyhole and into the Queen's official and private residences. Buckingham Palace The Queen's official London home dates from 1703 when the Duke of Buckingham built a fine townhouse in the capital's fashionable St James's district. The townhouse was acquired by King George III in 1761 and lavishly enlarged in the 19th century. Buckingham Palace The 830,000-square foot palace comprises a total of 775 rooms...
Sex toy company which spied on customers bedroom habits to pay £2.4m in compensation
Canada, ENGLISH

Sex toy company which spied on customers bedroom habits to pay £2.4m in compensation

    A sex toy manufacturer has been ordered to pay out £2.4 million in compensation after it spied on its customers. The makers of the We-Vibe 4 Plus sex toy must pay each customer up to £6,120 each after it used the £115 remote-controlled gadget to track peoples bedroom habits. The devices gathered information on temperature changes, the settings that customers chose and also peoples email addresses. The toy is designed for people in long-distance relationships with couples able to control the device even when they’re in the next city. But Standard Innovation, the Canadian company which makes the toy, was sued after couples discovered their details were being sent back to the company without their permission, the Mail Online reported. The company will pay out £2.4 million, in...
Headphone batteries explode on flight to Australia
Australia, ENGLISH

Headphone batteries explode on flight to Australia

    A woman whose headphones caught fire on a plane suffered burns to her face and hands, Australian officials said Wednesday as they warned about the dangers of battery-operated devices in-flight. The passenger was listening to music on her own battery-operated headphones as she dozed about two hours into the trip from Beijing to Melbourne on February 19 when there was a loud explosion. As I went to turn around I felt burning on my face, she told the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) which investigated the incident. I just grabbed my face which caused the headphones to go around my neck. I continued to feel burning so I grabbed them off and threw them on the floor. They were sparking and had small amounts of fire. Flight attendants rushed to help and poured a bucket o...
Fury after historic headscarf ruling
ENGLISH, Europe

Fury after historic headscarf ruling

    In its first ruling on an issue that has become highly charged across Europe, the Court of Justice (ECJ) found a Belgian firm which had a rule that employees who dealt with customers should not wear visible religious or political symbols may not have discriminated against a Muslim receptionist it dismissed for wearing a headscarf. The judgement on that and a French case came on the eve of a Dutch election in which Muslim immigration is a key issue and weeks before a similarly charged presidential vote in France, where headscarves are banned in public service jobs. French conservative candidate Francois Fillon hailed the ECJ ruling as an immense relief to companies and workers that would contribute to social peace. But a group backing the fired employees said the ruling may...
Angry response from White House as Donald Trump tax returns leaked
America, ENGLISH

Angry response from White House as Donald Trump tax returns leaked

    The White House has responded angrily after Donald Trump's tax returns were leaked, showing the President earned £123million in 2005. According to the documents, the billionaire paid £31 million in income taxes on the earnings. They show the President paid a rate that was effectively just under 25 per cent thanks to a tax he has since sought to abolish. The pages from Mr Trump's federal tax return show the then-real estate mogul also reported a business loss of 85 million in 2005, although the documents do not provide details. The forms show Mr Trump paid an effective tax rate of 24.5 per cent, a figure well above the roughly 10 per cent the average American taxpayer hands over each year. © Provided by Independent Print Limited But it is below the 27.4 per cent that taxpay...