Sunday, April 14

Day: January 1, 2020

The maps show how much Labour has lost in the 2010s
Featured, United Kingdom

The maps show how much Labour has lost in the 2010s

    Side-by-side maps of UK constituencies at the start and end of the 2010s show a clear picture of how Labour’s support has eroded over the decade. Labour faces a major rebuilding job in the 2020s, starting with the election of a new leader in the New Year. The two maps available under Creative Commons - show how the Conservatives have made gains in northern England and Wales, while Labour has also lost a huge amount of ground to the SNP in Scotland. They are a stark representation of Labour’s failure in the last four elections, having only gained seats once, in 2017. Labour leadership candidates and MPs expected to run have been making suggestions on how the party can make up these losses and win a future election. Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, s...
How to conquer debt in 2020: Five key steps to take yourself out of the red
Featured, Life Style

How to conquer debt in 2020: Five key steps to take yourself out of the red

    Tomorrow marks the start of a new decade and for many, getting out of debt might be the number one goal but they might not know where to start. Our recent analysis revealed that the personal debt mountain continued to grow in the 2010s and Britons are £45billion more in the red than they were a decade ago when it comes to credit cards, personal loans and credit cards. The festive period can also be expensive and could see households falling behind on financial commitments after splashing out. Half of those already in debt will be in a worse financial position after Christmas with 20 per cent worried they will be unable to recover, according to research from YouGov. The average person spends around £1,100 a year on Christmas with almost £400 of that going on gifts....
Sterling’s rise takes toll on the markets
Featured, United Kingdom

Sterling’s rise takes toll on the markets

    The Santa rally well and truly ran out of steam for the FTSE 100 on the last day of 2019. Investors had been enjoying an 11-day rise on the blue-chip index, including nine days of gains following Boris Johnson’s decisive Tory victory in the election. But the FTSE 100 dipped 0.6 per cent, or 44.61 points, to 7542.44, during a half-day of trading curtailed for New Year’s Eve. It was the second consecutive day of losses, drawing a line under its longest climb for three years, as a stronger pound dragged down internationally exposed companies. Sterling rose 1.2 per cent against the dollar over the course of the day to around $1.328, its highest level in two weeks. A rise in sterling generally has the opposite effect on the FTSE 100, since a more valuable domestic curr...