Friday, July 19

Day: July 3, 2015

10 tourist traps you should avoid in Italy and where to go instead
ENGLISH, Europe

10 tourist traps you should avoid in Italy and where to go instead

    San Gimignano Ask almost anyone and they'll tell you that Italy is on their bucket list: the art, the culture, and the food is world famous for a reason. But Italy is big, and it can be overwhelming for first timers, who inevitably, bowled over by choice, fall into overpriced tourist traps. Here are the places you should avoid, and the often cheaper, always more authentic alternatives you should hit instead.  1. Instead of getting disappointed by the Leaning Tower of Pisa, check out the medieval towers in the town of San Gimignano. If we told you to go see a tilting old tower that wasn't Pisa would you? Probably not, and you should avoid the surprisingly small and devastatingly disappointing Leaning Tower of Pisa too. Want to see old towers? Visit San Gimignano, a mo...
We are no longer poor
Bangladesh, ENGLISH

We are no longer poor

    Prime minister’s son and her ICT Adviser Sajeeb Ahmed Wazed Joy has thanked the Awami League government for its hard work to turn Bangladesh into a lower-middle-income country. Reiterating her mother’s new target, he hoped Bangladesh would become a higher-middle-income economy by the end of the government’s current tenure. In a Facebook post, he wrote, “Bangladesh is no longer a poor country. It is now officially a middle-income country. “Per capita income has more than doubled during the past six years of our government, poverty level almost halved, tremendous development has taken place in all socio-economic sectors.” Attributing the progress to the efforts of the government, he said, “All thanks to the hard work of our Awami League government.” World Bank on Wedne...
Osborne’s first budget without Lib Dems likely to hit welfare state hard
ENGLISH, United Kingdom

Osborne’s first budget without Lib Dems likely to hit welfare state hard

    Cuts to housing benefit, a further lowering of the overall welfare cap and reductions to in-work tax credits are all being considered by George Osborne in next week’s budget, as he seeks to roll back what he regards as a bloated welfare state expanded by Gordon Brown during his tenure of the Treasury. Osborne is preparing to say that Brown’s policy decision to increase tax credits distorted welfare and made workers became dependent on the state, rather than an employer, for a decent income. The chancellor – in the first budget he has been able to deliver without the Liberal Democrats – will temper the £12bn of welfare cuts with a rise in the personal tax allowance and a commitment to do more to persuade employers to boost pay to compensate for the loss of income, possib...