Tuesday, April 16

Day: May 28, 2018

Obese staff allowed to start work later to avoid anxiety during rush hour
Featured, United Kingdom

Obese staff allowed to start work later to avoid anxiety during rush hour

    Obese staff should be allowed to start work later to avoid anxiety during rush-hour, a government advisor recommends. Britain’s obesity problem is the worst in Western Europe with the number of people in England, Wales and Scotland diagnosed expected to double by 2035. In accordance with this rise, an employment expert has suggested that overweight employees should be offered flexible starts and should have the right to sue employers if they are not offered jobs or promotions because of their weight. Speaking at the European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Professor Stephan Bevan, of the Institute for Employment Studies, said letting obese staff who feel anxious about travelling on public transport arrive an hour later, or work from home, would help their mental hea...
Pay as you recycling scheme being planned by councils
Featured, United Kingdom

Pay as you recycling scheme being planned by councils

    A new pay-as-you-throw recycling scheme being planned by councils will cost homeowners as much as £50 extra per year unless food packaging is overhauled, waste experts have warned. The controversial pay-as-you-throw collection scheme, proposed by council chiefs, is designed to encourage people to recycle more by charging them for the weight of the general waste they put out. But according to one of Britain's biggest waste collection companies the move could leave millions of families worse off unless food manufacturers are forced to improve the recyclability of packaging. Today Suez is calling for the Government to force food manufacturers to make all packaging sold in the UK at least 50 per cent recyclable by 2025. At present less than 10 per cent of packaging is...
May under pressure to change the law on abortion in Britain after yes won to Northern Ireland
Featured, United Kingdom

May under pressure to change the law on abortion in Britain after yes won to Northern Ireland

    Theresa May is under increasing pressure to change the law on abortion in Northern Ireland after scores of her own… Theresa May is under increasing pressure to change the law on abortion in Northern Ireland after scores of her own ministers called on her to back a vote on the issue. Anne Milton, the skills minister and former deputy chief whip, became the latest to back a free vote in the House of Commons after Ireland voted to allow women access to abortions this weekend. Other ministers have called for a referendum, but the Prime Minister is in a difficult position because any change in the law would be strongly opposed by the DUP, the party on which she relies for her Commons majority. Arlene Foster, the DUP leader, warned the decision will be for Northern Irela...
Teacher corrects many silly mistakes of Trump letter and sent back to White House
America, Featured

Teacher corrects many silly mistakes of Trump letter and sent back to White House

    In 17 years of teaching English composition in South Carolina public schools, Yvonne Mason had seen these blunders many times before. Redundancies. Faulty capitalization. Lack of clarity and specificity. But Mason wasn't grading a student paper. She was reading a letter she received from President Donald Trump. I have never, ever, received a letter with this many silly mistakes, Mason said. The former Mauldin High School teacher promptly did what she had done thousands of times before: She corrected the writing and returned it, this one going back to the White House. Mason recognizes, of course, that the form letter she received from the president was very likely written by a staff member, not Trump, though the letter does include Trump's signature. It came in re...
Savita Halappanavar may named of Ireland’s abortion law
Europe, Featured

Savita Halappanavar may named of Ireland’s abortion law

    Savita Halappanavar, whose father has called for legislation that will follow Saturday’s historic referendum result to be referred to… Campaigners for abortion reform in Ireland have said they will support a move to have a new law named after Savita Halappanavar, who died after being denied a termination in 2012. Halappanavar’s father has called for the legislation that will follow the historic referendum result to be referred to as Savita’s law. We have one last request, that the new law, that it is called Savita’s law. It should be named for her, Andanappa Yalagi told the Irish Times. At a press conference in Dublin on Sunday, Together for Yes, an umbrella group representing pro-repeal organisations, said it would support such a move. It also called on the govern...